The Empty Can

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In some ways the internet has made instant scholars and industry “insiders” of us all. Rare is the public conversation nowadays where the smartphones don’t come out for fact-checking or the eventual “have you seen this youtube video/meme”. It has had a staggering impact on show business coverage with a mess of editorials, blogs, vlogs, tweets, etc., popping up on a seemingly daily basis to cover every inch and every angle of the industry. Film studios have in no way ignored the marketing potential of this living connection with their demographics and continue to run successful viral campaigns and social media schemes that build tremendous anticipation for upcoming projects, but as anyone in the business would testify, this exposure has a darker side for film production, even a potentially damaging one.

It used to be that rumors would surface here-and-there of a book being optioned or popular classic being adapted to the silver screen with such-and-such famous actor slated to star. The trailer would arrive some time after that, maybe a few months before the release of the motion picture and then another couple of months before we could watch it at home. Rumors and announcements were still largely the domain of speciality magazines and studio websites that would work in tandem with the artist to progressively wet viewer appetites. There existed a brief period of “silence” where the imagination and anticipation of the public could organically grow into excitment.

Today film industry news has become a rampaging monster, and insatiable beast, part-investigative journalism, part-obscenely-speculative TMZ fodder. The rumor mill has become a 24/7 media guargantuan with CNN muscles, beating every shred of film news into a messy pulp before any of the actual involved parties can even draw breath. The recent debacles at Marvel are a great example of the feeding frenzy that can issue from a single internal business decision. What used to be natural fluctuations in the studio system, be it staff changes, casting changes, release date re-scheduling, or logistical alterations, have now become critical updates and “breaking” stories that are reported with the emergency of a 3rd World catastrophe.

The tabloid/paparazzi fever that is usually reserved for drunk-driving starlets and philandering rock stars has turned its Sauron-like eye on the film production industry with a zeal that borders on the ludicrous. Audience participation has further amplified these stories by another factor of ten leading into completely innocuous debates over who was wronged in Hollywood contract disputes (that no one has any actual direct link to), or generated entire news cycles of highly speculative hearsay that lack even the most basic foothold in factual data.

Blurry leaked production pics are investigated like UFO sightings, bloggers write entire opinion columns denouncing studios, slagging off actors/directors, or defending them against injustices without having the slightest clue. Meanwhile filmmakers who want to stay connected to the audience and incorporate social media realities into their craft are forced into ridiculous Twitter standoffs with the various purveyors of these rumors or they might get cornered trying to justify some random artistic decision that has been inflated into full-blown online controversy (see Ben Affleck casting as Batman). This noise cannot be positive for the filmmakers.

Maybe all this senseless reporting is a good thing, creating a kind of biosphere for cinema that somehow renders it more democratic and opens avenues for the audience to make its voice heard regarding what is produced and how it is produced. It gets people thinking and breathing cinema and that should be a plus, right? One can’t help but wonder however if the patients are taking over the proverbial ward.

Filmmaking is a delicate and time-consuming endeavor that is hard enough to carry out without the deafening drone of the media breathing down your neck the entire time. There must be a way of preserving some shred of calm to let the artists build their projects before we dissect them at an atomic level. This new obsession of spoiling scripts and exposing sets/costumes ten months before the fact is deflating films before they can even come into existence and will not contribute to better films. Studios should also strongly reconsider over-exposing their projects with never-ending trailers and tv spots.

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One thought on “The Empty Can

  1. best line ever;
    “The tabloid/paparazzi fever that is usually reserved for drunk-driving starlets and philandering rock stars has turned its Sauron-like eye on the film production industry with a zeal that borders on the ludicrous.”

    I thing the industry needs to take a step back from social media, blogs, etc. the media should also step back from hollywood and report actual news.

    this current state hurts consumers, creators, and news agencies.

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