What’s my Motivation?

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I have wanted to tell stories for as long as I can remember, and while I dabbled in drawing, sculpting, or short-story writing, nothing ever made as much sense to me as filmmaking. It is the complete storytelling art from, the ultimate audio-visual communication instrument.

The unparalleled control and magnitude of expression that filmmaking affords a storyteller does not come without a hefty (and quite literal) price; it is a collaborative art and requires a serious investment in time, energy, and industry.

Even if you are one of the lucky ones that got his/her foot into the big leagues and make films that actually turn a profit, there is nevertheless a cost to pay spiritually and physically for every film you create.

For these reasons alone a filmmaker (and any artist, really) should always take the time to not only fully consider their true motivations behind their work, but also continually reassess them to make sure that you stay true, if not honest with your art. That is not to say that all your work must flow directly from your soul and serve the unique purpose of expressing your art, but when engaged in any material that is yours, try to ask yourself, “Why am I making this? Who am I making it for?”.

This questioning is important for many reasons, but mainly it is a surefire way to adapt to the changes that you go through as an artist as you become older, more seasoned, and your outlook on life, art, and society shift with the phases of time.

You may discover that becoming a Hollywood success is no longer your goal as a filmmaker, or maybe it never was. Maybe you realize that your tastes have changed and want to pursue other genres and styles that are completely incongruent with your past work. Maybe you want to experiment or even deconstruct the themes you have stuck to so far and look underneath the surface of that work to get to the tenderest meat.

Whatever the case, the point is to never stop searching your feelings and asking yourself these types of questions. It may not lead to financial or industry success, but you’ll do work that you will be fond of many years from now, if for no other reason that it will be representative of your art in that given time and context.

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